TREATING CHRONIC PAIN: FOCUS ON THE DISABILITY by Cecilia L. Stevens, PhD

Cecilia L Stevens, PhD , came to naturopathic medicine after a career in research chemistry; she is now a 4th-year student at Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine (BINM) in British Columbia. After her own struggles with chronic pain and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Cecilia is interested in helping patients with chronic pain and illness by harmonizing naturopathic treatments with conventional medical regimens.

Cecilia L Stevens, PhD, came to naturopathic medicine after a career in research chemistry; she is now a 4th-year student at Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine (BINM) in British Columbia. After her own struggles with chronic pain and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Cecilia is interested in helping patients with chronic pain and illness by harmonizing naturopathic treatments with conventional medical regimens.

Congratulations to Cecilia for being awarded the NDNR STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP – 1ST PLACE RESEARCH REVIEW for 2019. With the supervision of Dr. Shabita Teja, BPharm, ND the article focuses on treating chronic pain.

Here is an excerpt:

“Formally, the definition of chronic pain is pain where therapy may provide some relief but the underlying cause of the pain cannot be resolved. This certainly applies to the lingering neuralgia that was included in the informal definition, but it also extends to medical conditions that cause ongoing tissue damage, such as osteoarthritis or autoimmune disorders, as well as to the pain of cancer or other terminal illnesses. Chronic pain can theoretically be diagnosed after only a few days of suffering. The commonality between these definitions is that chronic pain is incurable. This difficult reality adds an enormous mental and emotional weight to the pain along with its physical consequences. In order to holistically treat chronic pain, it is imperative that all aspects of this complex condition be considered.

Pain of any kind has strong mental and emotional components. This is evident clinically when observing patients’ different reactions to the same procedures; a blood draw, for example, can cause one patient severe discomfort yet leave the next patient unaffected. Although the physical stimulus is the same, it represents only 1 component of pain. Cognition, expectation, memory, and emotion also play a part in the actual experience of pain. This suggests that the experience of pain can be diminished through learned attitudes and behaviors. “

Read the full article at NDNR.com

https://ndnr.com/pain-medicine/treating-chronic-pain-focus-on-the-disability/?fbclid=IwAR3N-LetGQ7j1bksn1pvaor-qSXp59OJDwCE1rBRDrQhQLe4KDKfNC_FWHU